Academic & Public research partners


St. George’s, University of London

Co-ordinating Institution 
www.sgul.ac.uk

St. George’s, University of London is the UK’s only independent medical and healthcare higher education institution. St George’s is a modern, innovative academic and research organisation built upon a rich history stretching back 250 years. St George’s research aims are to investigate and develop new, pioneering methods and treatments to improve public health in the local, national and international arena and in some of the poorest regions in the world.



The Institute for Infection and Immunity integrates different disciplines within St George's providing a diverse and rich source of expertise in pathogen, immunology, and clinical translational research; aimed at improvements in the diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of major infectious disease challenges of UK and global importance – notably HIV, sexually transmitted and associated infections; malaria; tuberculosis; and health-care associated infections.
The critical mass and vitality of the Institute is enhanced by on-site collaborations with an increasing number of NHS-based affiliates and trainees in the Clinical Infection Unit, Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Chest and Genitourinary Medicine, giving emphasis on the opportunities for clinical research provided by our co-location with St George’s Hospital NHS Trust.


Key people



Prof. Julian Ma, Project co-ordinator & Workpackage 1 Lead.

Julian Ma is the Hotung Professor of Molecular Immunology at St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London and an honorary hospital consultant in the Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Guy’s Hospital, London. He obtained his PhD in Immunology from the University of London in 1991, and was subsequently awarded a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Fellowship to study Plant Molecular Farming.

He took up a permanent academic position at the United Medical and Dental Schools, Univ. of London in 1993 and was appointed to full professor at St. George’s in 2003. He leads a large research group, studying basic mechanisms of protein expression in plant cells, and the design and engineering of novel recombinant proteins in plants for systemic and mucosal vaccination and immunotherapy. He was the Founding President of the International Society for Plant Molecular Farming.



Dr Sebastian Fuller, Workpackage 2 Lead.

Sebastian Fuller is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Social Science Lead for the Applied Diagnostic Research and Evaluation Unit (ADREU), at St George’s, and has worked in social science and grassroots community development for health in the UK, USA, and sub-Saharan Africa for the past thirteen years. He has been an invited advisor to the World Health Organisation for patient considerations of novel diagnostics, he was the first US Peace Corps Volunteer to receive a President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) grant for his work on community health development in Ghana, and he has received grant funding from the UK National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation programme for his work with clinicians, patients and the public in the UK. He has developed and maintains the ADREU Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) programme.

Mark
                 
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 774078.


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